Posts in local eating
mango cucumber salad

David has been outside this morning picking out the field of dandelions that plague our yard and pruning back the holly and juniper bushes.  Spring cleaning is up and running after a quick trip to Lowe's to buy some pruning sheers, gardening bags, and gloves. While David enjoyed his zen-like garden work, I threw together a salad that reminds me so much of the Spring/Summer weather we are heading into. Screen Shot 2013-04-20 at 1.50.02 PM

First you start by cleaning and de-stemming some watercress

Screen Shot 2013-04-20 at 1.50.16 PM

Peel, slice, and dice a mango

Screen Shot 2013-04-20 at 1.51.30 PM

Cube up some avocado and also cube up half of a cucumber and toss together in a large bowl

Screen Shot 2013-04-20 at 1.50.31 PM

Screen Shot 2013-04-20 at 1.50.47 PM

Once all of your dicing and chopping is complete, it is time to mix up the dressing. Use 3 teaspoons of fish sauce, zest of 1 lime, juice of 1 lime,  1 teaspoon of brown sugar, 1 tablespoon of olive oil and 1 teaspoon of rice vinegar.  Combine in a bowl.

Screen Shot 2013-04-20 at 1.51.03 PM

Then drizzle dressing into salad right before serving, toss together, and enjoy a tropical treat.

Screen Shot 2013-04-20 at 1.51.16 PM

mango cucumber salad

David has been outside this morning picking out the field of dandelions that plague our yard and pruning back the holly and juniper bushes.  Spring cleaning is up and running after a quick trip to Lowe's to buy some pruning sheers, gardening bags, and gloves. While David enjoyed his zen-like garden work, I threw together a salad that reminds me so much of the Spring/Summer weather we are heading into. Screen Shot 2013-04-20 at 1.50.02 PM

First you start by cleaning and de-stemming some watercress

Screen Shot 2013-04-20 at 1.50.16 PM

Peel, slice, and dice a mango

Screen Shot 2013-04-20 at 1.51.30 PM

Cube up some avocado and also cube up half of a cucumber and toss together in a large bowl

Screen Shot 2013-04-20 at 1.50.31 PM

Screen Shot 2013-04-20 at 1.50.47 PM

Once all of your dicing and chopping is complete, it is time to mix up the dressing. Use 3 teaspoons of fish sauce, zest of 1 lime, juice of 1 lime,  1 teaspoon of brown sugar, 1 tablespoon of olive oil and 1 teaspoon of rice vinegar.  Combine in a bowl.

Screen Shot 2013-04-20 at 1.51.03 PM

Then drizzle dressing into salad right before serving, toss together, and enjoy a tropical treat.

Screen Shot 2013-04-20 at 1.51.16 PM

mango cucumber salad

David has been outside this morning picking out the field of dandelions that plague our yard and pruning back the holly and juniper bushes.  Spring cleaning is up and running after a quick trip to Lowe's to buy some pruning sheers, gardening bags, and gloves. While David enjoyed his zen-like garden work, I threw together a salad that reminds me so much of the Spring/Summer weather we are heading into. Screen Shot 2013-04-20 at 1.50.02 PM

First you start by cleaning and de-stemming some watercress

Screen Shot 2013-04-20 at 1.50.16 PM

Peel, slice, and dice a mango

Screen Shot 2013-04-20 at 1.51.30 PM

Cube up some avocado and also cube up half of a cucumber and toss together in a large bowl

Screen Shot 2013-04-20 at 1.50.31 PM

Screen Shot 2013-04-20 at 1.50.47 PM

Once all of your dicing and chopping is complete, it is time to mix up the dressing. Use 3 teaspoons of fish sauce, zest of 1 lime, juice of 1 lime,  1 teaspoon of brown sugar, 1 tablespoon of olive oil and 1 teaspoon of rice vinegar.  Combine in a bowl.

Screen Shot 2013-04-20 at 1.51.03 PM

Then drizzle dressing into salad right before serving, toss together, and enjoy a tropical treat.

Screen Shot 2013-04-20 at 1.51.16 PM

zesty quinoa with broccoli and cashews
We do not eat enough quinoa. Tonight we decided to correct this.  Often we are guilty of planning a meal around a particular animal protein putting the veggies and grains on the side.  While we always choose lean proteins (when we are not trying to impress dinner guests), we decided to spend this week putting quinoa and veggies on center stage.  Whenever I am unsure of how to prepare an ingredient my go to online resource is the Whole Foods site.  I stumbled across this recipe: Zesty Quinoa with Broccoli and Cashews. They are not kidding when they say this meal is "zesty!"  It was quite delicious and we are going to put it into our regular "rotation" for quick and nutritious week night meals.
zesty quinoa with broccoli and cashews
We do not eat enough quinoa. Tonight we decided to correct this.  Often we are guilty of planning a meal around a particular animal protein putting the veggies and grains on the side.  While we always choose lean proteins (when we are not trying to impress dinner guests), we decided to spend this week putting quinoa and veggies on center stage.  Whenever I am unsure of how to prepare an ingredient my go to online resource is the Whole Foods site.  I stumbled across this recipe: Zesty Quinoa with Broccoli and Cashews. They are not kidding when they say this meal is "zesty!"  It was quite delicious and we are going to put it into our regular "rotation" for quick and nutritious week night meals.
zesty quinoa with broccoli and cashews
We do not eat enough quinoa. Tonight we decided to correct this.  Often we are guilty of planning a meal around a particular animal protein putting the veggies and grains on the side.  While we always choose lean proteins (when we are not trying to impress dinner guests), we decided to spend this week putting quinoa and veggies on center stage.  Whenever I am unsure of how to prepare an ingredient my go to online resource is the Whole Foods site.  I stumbled across this recipe: Zesty Quinoa with Broccoli and Cashews. They are not kidding when they say this meal is "zesty!"  It was quite delicious and we are going to put it into our regular "rotation" for quick and nutritious week night meals.
Summer Berry Trifle

Berries are nature's summer candy. Strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, and blackberries stock my refrigerator with their tasty healthiness. When we moved into our home, we were told by our neighbor that we were the new owners of a blueberry bush.  Unfortunately, our berries were poached by the local crows before I could even enjoy one harvest. Next spring and summer, I will be more diligent in the guarding of these little blues.  Good thing I could still get my berry fix from the Sunday farmer's market down the road. Now while I am ready for the first signs of a Fall chill and cozying up in a sweater, I am still reveling in late days of berry season. Perhaps it is all right that we still have three more weeks to share is these bountiful treats. Image

Summer Berry Trifle

1 carton blueberries

1 carton strawberries

1 sponge cake

2 cups heavy cream

1/4 cup sugar

2 teaspoons vanilla

In a bowl with a hand mixer, mix vanilla, sugar, and heavy cream until peaks form and a light frothy whipped cream is made. In a trifle bowl, or really any bowl , slice the sponge cake into 1 inch or 1/2 inch slices and line the base of the bowl. Top with a layer of strawberries and blueberries and cover with a layer of whipped cream.  Repeat this until the bowl is layered and ready to be shared as a light, sweet dessert .

Summer Berry Trifle

Berries are nature's summer candy. Strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, and blackberries stock my refrigerator with their tasty healthiness. When we moved into our home, we were told by our neighbor that we were the new owners of a blueberry bush.  Unfortunately, our berries were poached by the local crows before I could even enjoy one harvest. Next spring and summer, I will be more diligent in the guarding of these little blues.  Good thing I could still get my berry fix from the Sunday farmer's market down the road. Now while I am ready for the first signs of a Fall chill and cozying up in a sweater, I am still reveling in late days of berry season. Perhaps it is all right that we still have three more weeks to share is these bountiful treats. Image

Summer Berry Trifle

1 carton blueberries

1 carton strawberries

1 sponge cake

2 cups heavy cream

1/4 cup sugar

2 teaspoons vanilla

In a bowl with a hand mixer, mix vanilla, sugar, and heavy cream until peaks form and a light frothy whipped cream is made. In a trifle bowl, or really any bowl , slice the sponge cake into 1 inch or 1/2 inch slices and line the base of the bowl. Top with a layer of strawberries and blueberries and cover with a layer of whipped cream.  Repeat this until the bowl is layered and ready to be shared as a light, sweet dessert .

Summer Berry Trifle

Berries are nature's summer candy. Strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, and blackberries stock my refrigerator with their tasty healthiness. When we moved into our home, we were told by our neighbor that we were the new owners of a blueberry bush.  Unfortunately, our berries were poached by the local crows before I could even enjoy one harvest. Next spring and summer, I will be more diligent in the guarding of these little blues.  Good thing I could still get my berry fix from the Sunday farmer's market down the road. Now while I am ready for the first signs of a Fall chill and cozying up in a sweater, I am still reveling in late days of berry season. Perhaps it is all right that we still have three more weeks to share is these bountiful treats. Image

Summer Berry Trifle

1 carton blueberries

1 carton strawberries

1 sponge cake

2 cups heavy cream

1/4 cup sugar

2 teaspoons vanilla

In a bowl with a hand mixer, mix vanilla, sugar, and heavy cream until peaks form and a light frothy whipped cream is made. In a trifle bowl, or really any bowl , slice the sponge cake into 1 inch or 1/2 inch slices and line the base of the bowl. Top with a layer of strawberries and blueberries and cover with a layer of whipped cream.  Repeat this until the bowl is layered and ready to be shared as a light, sweet dessert .

Costa Rica

For the next ten days, I will not be able to blog.  Sixteen students, two colleagues, and I will be going to volunteer in Costa Rica.  Half of our visit will be working on an organic coffee plantation and the other half will be working with sea turtles.  See you in a few days with updates on this global works trip!

Costa Rica

For the next ten days, I will not be able to blog.  Sixteen students, two colleagues, and I will be going to volunteer in Costa Rica.  Half of our visit will be working on an organic coffee plantation and the other half will be working with sea turtles.  See you in a few days with updates on this global works trip!

Costa Rica

For the next ten days, I will not be able to blog.  Sixteen students, two colleagues, and I will be going to volunteer in Costa Rica.  Half of our visit will be working on an organic coffee plantation and the other half will be working with sea turtles.  See you in a few days with updates on this global works trip!

Backyard

Since moving into our new house, David and I have struggled to confront our lawn situation.  The entire plot of land that our beautiful, little house sits on is covered in weeds - dandelions in particular. While convention dictates that we use chemicals to tackle these evolutionarily successful, opportunistic weeds, we have decided to go more natural and avoid the use of all chemicals.  Therefore, sweat equity is the currency in our backyard.  Rakes, hoes, and shovels are our tools of choice.  In the baking summer sun we worked for about three hours toiling in the soil, collecting weeds, and sprinkling seeds.  It is a great feeling to work in the soil with our hands. The dirt under my nails was a badge of honor and those same dirty fingers are crossed for the grass to start growing! Image

How to:

Take a rake, a strong back, and determination over a plot of land.  Rake up the weeds, making sure to remove the deep roots of the dandelions. Turn up the soil to release nutrients and aerate. Sprinkle grass seeds over the soil as evenly as possible making sure to cover the lawn fully.  Water grass seed patch 2 times daily.  Keep fingers crossed for successful growth!

While we were out there, we also planted some basil seeds, tomatoes, and roman chamomile.  We used a small seedling starter for the chamomile. For the basil and tomatoes, we used an antique soda box.  Hopefully, we will have our little garden growing sooner than later.  Watch for updates!

Imagearmin

Backyard

Since moving into our new house, David and I have struggled to confront our lawn situation.  The entire plot of land that our beautiful, little house sits on is covered in weeds - dandelions in particular. While convention dictates that we use chemicals to tackle these evolutionarily successful, opportunistic weeds, we have decided to go more natural and avoid the use of all chemicals.  Therefore, sweat equity is the currency in our backyard.  Rakes, hoes, and shovels are our tools of choice.  In the baking summer sun we worked for about three hours toiling in the soil, collecting weeds, and sprinkling seeds.  It is a great feeling to work in the soil with our hands. The dirt under my nails was a badge of honor and those same dirty fingers are crossed for the grass to start growing! Image

How to:

Take a rake, a strong back, and determination over a plot of land.  Rake up the weeds, making sure to remove the deep roots of the dandelions. Turn up the soil to release nutrients and aerate. Sprinkle grass seeds over the soil as evenly as possible making sure to cover the lawn fully.  Water grass seed patch 2 times daily.  Keep fingers crossed for successful growth!

While we were out there, we also planted some basil seeds, tomatoes, and roman chamomile.  We used a small seedling starter for the chamomile. For the basil and tomatoes, we used an antique soda box.  Hopefully, we will have our little garden growing sooner than later.  Watch for updates!

Imagearmin

Backyard

Since moving into our new house, David and I have struggled to confront our lawn situation.  The entire plot of land that our beautiful, little house sits on is covered in weeds - dandelions in particular. While convention dictates that we use chemicals to tackle these evolutionarily successful, opportunistic weeds, we have decided to go more natural and avoid the use of all chemicals.  Therefore, sweat equity is the currency in our backyard.  Rakes, hoes, and shovels are our tools of choice.  In the baking summer sun we worked for about three hours toiling in the soil, collecting weeds, and sprinkling seeds.  It is a great feeling to work in the soil with our hands. The dirt under my nails was a badge of honor and those same dirty fingers are crossed for the grass to start growing! Image

How to:

Take a rake, a strong back, and determination over a plot of land.  Rake up the weeds, making sure to remove the deep roots of the dandelions. Turn up the soil to release nutrients and aerate. Sprinkle grass seeds over the soil as evenly as possible making sure to cover the lawn fully.  Water grass seed patch 2 times daily.  Keep fingers crossed for successful growth!

While we were out there, we also planted some basil seeds, tomatoes, and roman chamomile.  We used a small seedling starter for the chamomile. For the basil and tomatoes, we used an antique soda box.  Hopefully, we will have our little garden growing sooner than later.  Watch for updates!

Imagearmin

Juicy

My brother's father-in-law posted this image on his facebook wall and it has stuck with me all day. Image

One of David's favorite mantras is: humans are afraid to recognize they are merely animals.  Perhaps this is why this graphic stood out so much as I scrolled through the various messages this morning. Perhaps it is also because of placing more organic living front and center these last few days.  For whatever reason, however, the "eco" side of this graphic illustrates exactly what I am aiming for: a new mindset about life and how one participates in it.

After a long day in the yard toiling in the soil of our overgrown weeds, we finally sat down to relax and watch a documentary.  Tonight's selection was Fat, Sick, and Nearly Dead.  Surprisingly, this was not of my choosing.  Rather, David called to me from the living room as I tidied up from dinner and said, "Hey, I think this would be interesting."  The documentary is not unlike many about food and Americans' particularly bad relationship with highly processed foods and animal proteins.  Yet, what was most enjoyable was the story of the protagonist's journey into creating a long lasting habit change.  The opposite of Super-Size Me, Joe transforms over the course of the film into a thinner, radiant, man who is unafraid to embrace exercise and who has shifted his primary food intake group from meat and processed items to vegetables and fruit.  His "food pyramid" has fruits and vegetables at its base.  What was impressive was not only how much weight he lost over the course of two months, but also how much healthier his skin and hair appeared and how much energy he demonstrated.  As a result of this quest he inspired many individuals who were at risk for heart attacks, skin conditions, migraines, and strokes to reboot their own eating and take ownership over their food choices.  One of my favorite moments in the film occurred when Joe asked average Americans who was to blame for their obesity or illness.  The unanimous response was: myself.

Since starting my own healthy journey this week, I am surprised by how much energy I have.  While I do know that I have only been organically focused for less than a week, I am encouraged to continue this journey and to continue to feel good and energetic.  I used to think it would be hard to break my habits.  And, in many ways, I do struggle against cravings and laziness, but I am also much more willing to get up and go than I was just three days ago and that is a measure of success in my book.

To help David and me continue with this momentum, I ordered a new "toy" for the kitchen.  That's right, we are drinking the "kool-aid."

Image

Juicy

My brother's father-in-law posted this image on his facebook wall and it has stuck with me all day. Image

One of David's favorite mantras is: humans are afraid to recognize they are merely animals.  Perhaps this is why this graphic stood out so much as I scrolled through the various messages this morning. Perhaps it is also because of placing more organic living front and center these last few days.  For whatever reason, however, the "eco" side of this graphic illustrates exactly what I am aiming for: a new mindset about life and how one participates in it.

After a long day in the yard toiling in the soil of our overgrown weeds, we finally sat down to relax and watch a documentary.  Tonight's selection was Fat, Sick, and Nearly Dead.  Surprisingly, this was not of my choosing.  Rather, David called to me from the living room as I tidied up from dinner and said, "Hey, I think this would be interesting."  The documentary is not unlike many about food and Americans' particularly bad relationship with highly processed foods and animal proteins.  Yet, what was most enjoyable was the story of the protagonist's journey into creating a long lasting habit change.  The opposite of Super-Size Me, Joe transforms over the course of the film into a thinner, radiant, man who is unafraid to embrace exercise and who has shifted his primary food intake group from meat and processed items to vegetables and fruit.  His "food pyramid" has fruits and vegetables at its base.  What was impressive was not only how much weight he lost over the course of two months, but also how much healthier his skin and hair appeared and how much energy he demonstrated.  As a result of this quest he inspired many individuals who were at risk for heart attacks, skin conditions, migraines, and strokes to reboot their own eating and take ownership over their food choices.  One of my favorite moments in the film occurred when Joe asked average Americans who was to blame for their obesity or illness.  The unanimous response was: myself.

Since starting my own healthy journey this week, I am surprised by how much energy I have.  While I do know that I have only been organically focused for less than a week, I am encouraged to continue this journey and to continue to feel good and energetic.  I used to think it would be hard to break my habits.  And, in many ways, I do struggle against cravings and laziness, but I am also much more willing to get up and go than I was just three days ago and that is a measure of success in my book.

To help David and me continue with this momentum, I ordered a new "toy" for the kitchen.  That's right, we are drinking the "kool-aid."

Image

Juicy

My brother's father-in-law posted this image on his facebook wall and it has stuck with me all day. Image

One of David's favorite mantras is: humans are afraid to recognize they are merely animals.  Perhaps this is why this graphic stood out so much as I scrolled through the various messages this morning. Perhaps it is also because of placing more organic living front and center these last few days.  For whatever reason, however, the "eco" side of this graphic illustrates exactly what I am aiming for: a new mindset about life and how one participates in it.

After a long day in the yard toiling in the soil of our overgrown weeds, we finally sat down to relax and watch a documentary.  Tonight's selection was Fat, Sick, and Nearly Dead.  Surprisingly, this was not of my choosing.  Rather, David called to me from the living room as I tidied up from dinner and said, "Hey, I think this would be interesting."  The documentary is not unlike many about food and Americans' particularly bad relationship with highly processed foods and animal proteins.  Yet, what was most enjoyable was the story of the protagonist's journey into creating a long lasting habit change.  The opposite of Super-Size Me, Joe transforms over the course of the film into a thinner, radiant, man who is unafraid to embrace exercise and who has shifted his primary food intake group from meat and processed items to vegetables and fruit.  His "food pyramid" has fruits and vegetables at its base.  What was impressive was not only how much weight he lost over the course of two months, but also how much healthier his skin and hair appeared and how much energy he demonstrated.  As a result of this quest he inspired many individuals who were at risk for heart attacks, skin conditions, migraines, and strokes to reboot their own eating and take ownership over their food choices.  One of my favorite moments in the film occurred when Joe asked average Americans who was to blame for their obesity or illness.  The unanimous response was: myself.

Since starting my own healthy journey this week, I am surprised by how much energy I have.  While I do know that I have only been organically focused for less than a week, I am encouraged to continue this journey and to continue to feel good and energetic.  I used to think it would be hard to break my habits.  And, in many ways, I do struggle against cravings and laziness, but I am also much more willing to get up and go than I was just three days ago and that is a measure of success in my book.

To help David and me continue with this momentum, I ordered a new "toy" for the kitchen.  That's right, we are drinking the "kool-aid."

Image